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Happy’s Best New Books of 2021 (26th July – 1st August)

Updated weekly by the fine folk at Happy Mag, these are the best new books that this week has to offer from Australia and around the world!

Akwaeke Emezi – Dear Senthuran: A Black Spirit Memoir 

From the author of Death of Vivek Oji and Pet comes one of the most anticipated memoirs of the year. Delivered in epistolatory form, it has already garnered the praise of contemporary luminaries, such as Roxane Gay. Straddling the world of the divine and the earthly, Dear Senthuran marks an unforgettable non-fiction debut from this acclaimed author. And though it ostensibly addresses questions of identity, it reveals so much more.

9.4

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Dear Senthuran
AKWAEKE EMEZI
DEAR SENTHURAN: A BLACK SPIRIT MEMOIR

Bridie Jabour – Trivial Grievances

Afflicted with millennianhood? Well, you’re probably used to getting a lot of bad press. Guardian journalist Bridie Jabour penned a viral article on the topic, crystalising the anxieties of a generation. Trivial Grievances is the more complex exploration of the millennial malaise, helping readers to understand their place in the world in the face of an uncertain future.

8.8

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Trivial Grievances
BRIDIE JABOUR
TRIVIAL GRIEVANCES

Sebastian Dobson and Sabine Arqué – Japan 1900

While colonial maps were being redrawn and the norms of international trade were being established, Japan was effectively cut off from the world. But in the Restoration period, which began in 1868, the nation was catapulted into modernity. Japan 1900 is a seminal document of this pivotal era, a stunning volume of photographs that capture the transformation of this intoxicating part of the world.

9.2

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Japan 1900

SEBASTIAN DOBSON AND SABINE ARQUÉ
JAPAN 1900

Lisa Wells – Believers

Believers is Lisa Wells’ thought-provoking response to the paradox of our times: how do we prepare for the future in the face of environmental change? She avoids a sweeping analysis in favour of interviews with individual changemakers. Through their stories, we’re able to see that a positive vision for the future and healthier relationships with our natural environments is within reach.

9.0

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Believers
LISA WELLS
BELIEVERS

Clem Bastow – Late Bloomer

Clem Bastow was at a loss when it came to reading the vagaries of human behaviour. Relationships were a mystery, friendships were hard work, and a continual undercurrent of anxiety coloured her life. Then, at 36, she was diagnosed with autism, and with it came clarity. In Late Bloomer, Bastow reflects on her development as someone with undiagnosed autism, addressing many a misconception along the way with customary charm.

8.9

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Late Bloomer
CLEM BASTOW
LATE BLOOMER

Katherine Brabon – The Shut Ins

From the Vogel Literary Award-winning author of The Memory Artist comes a disturbing and mesmeric look into a Japanese subculture. Hikikomori are people who seek complete disconnection from society, a bond that connects the characters of The Shut Ins. A delicate yet emotionally charged exploration of what it means to be alone.

8.8

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The Shut Ins

KATHERINE BRABON
THE SHUT INS