NASA just released the sound of a black hole and its scary beautiful
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NASA just released the sound of a black hole and its scary beautiful

Turn up the volume for this one, because there’s nothing on our planet like it! NASA just released the audio recording of a black hole, and it’s as scary as you imagined.

NASA has proven that there is sound in space, and finally, they have the audio to prove it. The space agency has unveiled the audio of what a black hole from 200 million light-years away sounds like to the human ear, thus laying to bed, once and for all, the notion that “in space, no one can hear you scream.”

Thanks to this audio clip, we can confirm that notion is nothing more than a fallacy. It has officially become as outdated as thinking the earth is flat (flat earthers, bottle it). 

The black hole featured in the audio video is located at the center of the Perseus Galaxy Cluster; a group of galaxies some 240 million light-years away. It was initially released in May, in honour of NASA’s Black Hole Week, with data that was discovered by the agency’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

NASA shared in a recent press release that it is a major misconception that there is no sound in space and that it had only originated because most space is a vacuum, providing no way for sound waves to travel: “Since 2003, the black hole at the center of the Perseus galaxy cluster has been associated with sound. This is because astronomers discovered that pressure waves sent out by the black hole caused ripples in the cluster’s hot gas that could be translated into a note.”

They continue, A galaxy cluster has copious amounts of gas that envelop the hundreds or even thousands of galaxies within it, providing a medium for the sound waves to travel. In fact, a galaxy cluster has so much gas that we’ve picked up actual sound. Here it’s amplified, and mixed with other data, to hear a black hole!” 

Speaking on the black hole sound discovery, NASA has stated: “Astronomers discovered that pressure waves sent out by the black hole caused ripples in the cluster’s hot gas that could be translated into a note — one that humans cannot hear some 57 octaves below middle C.”