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Anti-vaxxers believe unvaccinated sperm will “be the next Bitcoin”

We’re not kidding. Some anti-vaxxers believe that “unvaccinated semen will be the next Bitcoin”.

The internet is a wild place, but this might take the cake for this week’s ‘most bizarre story’. And, of course, it’s anti-vaxxers.

According to an article from VICE, a conspiracy theory regarding the sperm of certain men who have not been vaccinated for COVID-19 has gained popularity.

Bitcoin and sperm
Image: protos.com

The theory states that the sperm of unvaccinated men is more “pure” than those who are vaccinated.

This alleged purity comes (pun unintended) from the idea that the coronavirus vaccine has several “long-term side effects”.

While other people are receiving their vaccinations, the believers of this theory will stand back and watch “[a]s the vaccinated population eventually crumbles” from the side effects.

Consequently, women who want a baby will have to pay large amounts of money for sperm. The unvaccinated will then hand over their oh-so-precious man juice so that the world can repopulate.

Originally, the theory began as a meme on Twitter and then quickly gained traction on the “r/NoNewNormal” subreddit — a now suspended subreddit that perpetuated misinformation surrounding face masks and vaccines.

“I’m going to retire as a … ‘cum cow’,” a Reddit user posted on a forum, accompanied with a cow emoji. I mean, wow.

“Not just that, but a man who isn’t a sheep and doesn’t have long term side effects,” another person said in response to tomorrow’s cum cow.

But what does this have to do with Bitcoin?

Well, a blog dedicated to the cryptocurrency published an article titled: “Is unvaccinated sperm really the next Bitcoin?”

According to VICE, conspiracy theorists in the anti-vaxxer community took the title as fact and began spreading it amongst their peers as evidence that the theory is real.

“Cumshots worth 50k!? Nice,” a Redditor commented on a screenshot of the title posted to the site.

In reality, the article spoke of the opposite.

It debunked the conspiracy theory with evidence from the United States’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Specifically, it addressed the idea that the coronavirus vaccines affect men’s sperm because of “vaccine shedding”.

“Vaccine shedding is the term used to describe the release of discharge of any of the vaccine components in or outside of the body,” the CDC states on their website.

“Vaccine components are not shed by COVID-19 vaccines, so it is not possible for any of the vaccine components to accumulate in the body’s tissue or organs, including the ovaries.”

For clarity’s sake, Tony Chen, a clinical assistant professor at the Stanford School of Medicine’s urology department, had this to say regarding coronavirus vaccinations and sperm:

“There is evidence that the vaccine is safe for men and that it does not affect sperm production/quality.”