Music

The spacey sonics of ‘Sundrip’ from Slowjöy are indie-kid earbud fuel

Slowjöy have carefully developed and layered a debut EP that sounds worn-in, spaced-out, and easily enjoyable.

When I first hit play on EP Sundrip from Slowjöy, it quickly became apparent that this would be an enjoyable experience.

The songwriting was intriguing, the mixes were near-perfect, and the array of electric guitar tones ensured every song captured my interest. In celebration of this stunning debut, let’s flesh it this release a little more.

Slowjöy

Let’s start with the essentials. Slowjöy is a psych-rock band, consisting of Tom Spurgin and Daniel Mahler on guitars and vocals, Sam Castan on drums, and Lachlan Symons on bass. All the members have clearly spent a lot of time listening and studying the tones and trends of psychedelia, bringing their best sounds to the tracks. There’s plenty of commendable influences oozing out of Sundrip, including Pink Floyd, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, and Dungen.

The EP kicks off with Prophesy, a track that eases you in with some bright acoustic strumming, egg shaker, and summery electric chords. By the time the vocals come in, you’re already floating on a cloud. The band rapidly arrive at the chorus, demonstrating some tight songwriting. The trippy, memorable hook “pro-phe-sy” throws you in another daze, only to be woken up again by some delightfully rhythmic drum work in the second verse. Excellent start, Slowjöy.

Title track Sundrip is four and a half minutes of hazy reflection and tremolo-sounding electrics, taking a note out of Johnny Marr’s (The Smiths) book. The band really pushes for sonic exploration in this epic, and I challenge listeners to count the number of guitar tones/textures on this track. Needless to say, I lost count.

 

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Next track Algorithm feels like the most pop-centric track on the EP. It’s basted in Tame Impala influence, from the reverbed vocal performance to the tireless electric riff, and the ultra-tight drumming. Mr Dim. is a fascinating detour from the spaced-out tracks, beginning with some congas and tropical-sounding acoustic guitar. The melody is unconventional, but eventually paves the way to an absolute treat – a fuzzy guitar solo backed with tasty bass.

Seeker concludes the EP with colourful chords, an epic drum fill (you’ll know it when you hear it), and question-filled lyricism “What is it you want? What do you see?”. Much like the band’s eternal quest for psych-tones, it seems they are still searching for answers in life too. Ah yes, the life of an artist.

Listen to the stunning Sundrip EP from Slowjöy below: